Tweeting the budget: what people are interested in

When the Budget was released yesterday, I quickly pulled together two tables of information, one about where government was getting money from, and the other about where government was spending money.

The breakdown of revenue was available directly from the government’s own budget fact sheet. This table simply puts the information in a plainer form.

Projected government revenue for the year ending 30 June 2016

Projected government revenue for the year ending 30 June 2016

The breakdown of expenditure is a little more difficult to put together. Government only releases the total expenditure on welfare in its fact sheet. To get the values for individual benefits, you have to go to the detailed information in Vote Social Development, released under “The Estimates of Appropriations”.

Projected government expenditure for the year ending 30 June 2016

Projected government expenditure for the year ending 30 June 2016

What I find interesting is the number of times that each tweet was retweeted.

The tweet on where government was spending its money – retweeted 20 times.

But the tweet on where government was getting its money from? Only one person retweeted that.

So very few people are all that interested in where government revenue comes from, and yet it accounts for half the Budget. Tax alone accounts for 46% of the Budget.

My inner tax nerd is very sad.

This entry was posted in Economics, NZ Politics, Taxation and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Tweeting the budget: what people are interested in

  1. RossM says:

    “My inner tax nerd is very sad”. Well it might be. A lot of political thought appears to be based in misconceptions about tax, in particular the difference between where a tax is applied (say, company tax) and who actually supplies the money to pay it (customers). Please keep plugging away and providing these useful summaries.

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